The Shortest Nights Are With Dear

zoran-bogdanovic1977

The Shortest Nights Are With Dear

“The wind blows down,
It shakes the city,
A city girl
Shouts:
“Oh! long night!
Sleeping with grandma
On nine mattresses,
On nine pillows,
Under nine quilts. ”

The wind blows down,
It shakes the city,
A city girl
Shouts:
“Oh! long night!
Sleeping with his mother
On nine mattresses,
On nine pillows,
Under nine quilts. ”

The wind blows down,
It shakes the city,
A city girl
Shouts:
“Oh! long night!
Sleeping with my brother
On nine mattresses,
On nine pillows,
Under nine quilts. ”

The wind blows down,
It shakes the city,
A city girl
Shouts:
“Oh! long night!
Sleeping with my sister
On nine mattresses,
On nine pillows,
Under nine quilts. ”

The wind blows down,
It shakes the city,
A city girl
Shouts:
“Oh! short nights!
With dear sleeping
On one mattress,
on one pillow,
Under one quilt.”

Vuk Karadžić

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Vuk Karadžić
VukKaradzic.jpg

Vuk Karadžić, around 1850
Born
Vuk Stefanović Karadžić

7 November 1787

Tršić, Ottoman Empire (modern-day Serbia)
Died 7 February 1864 (aged 76)

Resting place St. Michael’s Cathedral, Belgrade, Serbia
Nationality Serbian
Alma mater Belgrade Higher School
Occupation Philologist, linguist
Known for Serbian language reform
Serbian Cyrillic alphabet
Movement Serbian Revival
Spouse(s) Anna Maria Kraus
Children 13, including Mina Karadžić

Vuk Stefanović Karadžić (pronounced [ʋûːk stefǎːnoʋitɕ kâradʒitɕ], Serbian Cyrillic: Вук Стефановић Караџић; 7 November 1787 – 7 February 1864) was a philologist and linguist who was the major reformer of the Serbian language.[1][2][3][4] For his collection and preservation of Serbian folktales, Encyclopædia Britannica labelled him “the father of Serbian folk-literature scholarship.”[5] He was also the author of the first Serbian dictionary in the new reformed language. In addition, he translated the New Testament into the reformed form of the Serbian spelling and language.[6]

Karadžić held the view that all South Slavs that speak the Shtokavian dialect were Serbs or of Serbian origin and considered all of them to speak the Serbian language, which is today a matter of dispute among scientists.[7][8][9] However, Karadžić wrote later that he gave up this view because he saw that the Croats of his time did not agree with it, and he switched to the definition of the Serbian nation based on Orthodoxy and the Croatian nation based on Catholicism.[10]

He was well known abroad and familiar to Jacob Grimm,[11] Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and historian Leopold von Ranke. Karadžić was the primary source for Ranke’s Die serbische Revolution (“The Serbian Revolution“), written in 1829.[12]

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